Inoue Crushes McDonnell In One.

Tokyo, Japan – Naoya “The Monster” Inoue waisting no time going right after Jamie McDonnell finishing him off at the official time of 1:50 seconds of round one by ways of TKO victory.

Photos: Naoki Fukuda 🇯🇵🥊

Ken Shiro (13-0, 7 KO’s) 寺地拳四朗 knocks out Ganigan Lopez (34-8, 19 KO’s) in round two for the WBC Light Flyweight Title.

Top Rank and Teiken Promotions has acquire the American rights to the card headlined by Japanese star Naoya “Monster” Inoue, who will move up in weight to go for a world title in his third weight class when he challenges secondary bantamweight titlist Jamie McDonnell at the Ota-City General Gymnasium in Tokyo.

Antonio Tarver Credits USA Boxing For Giving Him Structure That Carried Him To Top

Future Hall of Famer Antonio “The Magic Man” Tarver (31-6-1, 1 NC, 22 KOs) has just about done it all as a boxer having been an Olympic medal winner and world champion as an amateur, along with capturing five major light heavyweight world titles as a professional, as well as a pair of The Ring magazine’s top honors, and four other world championships in two different divisions.

“I credit USA Boxing for giving me structure for the first time in my life,” Tarver explained. “Everything was scheduled; curfew, eating, training, sleep….everything! I then understood that I had to be accountable for everything I did. I had talent, but I wasn’t structured, and that was bigger than me. I had to adjust to authority. My determination took off, giving me support I never had before. I went on to make speaking engagements and get sponsors. I broke barriers. I’ve been the best at every level that I fought at in the world.”

Tarver was a highly decorated amateur who had an amazing 158-12 record. He is the only boxer to capture gold medals at World Amateur Championships, U.S. National Championships and Pan-American Games in the same year (1995). The Orlando, Florida-born southpaw won a bronze medal at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, losing in the quarterfinals to future world champion Vassiliy Jirov, who Tarver had defeated in the semifinals of the 1995 World Amateur Championships. Tarver also won top honors at the 1994 National Golden Gloves Tournament and 1995 World Championships Challenge.

“I went on a winning roll in 1995 and went into the Olympics in rare form,” Tarver said. “And that’s why I was favored to win a gold medal. I was hitting him (Jirov), the same guy I’d beaten in the World Championships, but no points were registering for me. I had a good second round, but I was down three points, so I threw my game plan away in the third round. I felt I had to do more and got away from my style: counter punching, not getting hit, and being patient. I thought I had won and so did a lot of people. I made up for that, though, with a gold-medal professional career.

“I had been faced with a decision about going pro after I was beaten in the ’92 Olympic Trials. I decided to stay in the amateurs, despite not having any guarantees about making the 1996 U.S. Olympic Team. I sacrificed four years of my pro career, which is why I turned pro at a relatively late age (27). I was determined when I found out the 1996 Olympics were in Atlanta. I think I made the right decision and I have no regrets.

“I had always dreamed of going to the Olympics. I saw Roy Jones, Jr – we first fought each other at 13 – get robbed of gold. I was watching that on television, jumped up, and knew where I was heading: The Olympics! We both suffered horrible decisions in the Olympics and I knew then that our careers would be parallel.

Tarver made his pro debut February 18, 1997 in Philadelphia, stopping Joaquin Garcia (4-0) in the second round.

“I was an Olympic bronze medal winner but when I first turned pro,” Tarver added, “I didn’t have a promoter or manager. Nobody was willing to take a chance on me until I was 4-0, when I signed by first contract with Russell Peltz. I felt nobody could beat me.”

Nobody was able to beat Tarver, at least until his 17th pro fight, when Eric Harding defeated Tarver by way of a 12-round unanimous decision.

Two years later, Tarver embarked on a 12-fight murderer’s row stretch during the next seven years, arguably establishing him as the No. 1 pound-for-pound fighter in the world. It all started with a successful rematch with Harding (21-1-1) in Indianapolis, when Tarver dropped Harding in the fourth round, plus twice more in the fifth, on his way to a fifth-round technical knockout to avenge his lone pro loss to that date.

Next up for Tarver was a showdown with 44-3 Montell Griffin for the WBC and IBF 175-pound division titles, which were vacated by Roy Jones Jr., April 26, 2003 at Foxwoods Resort Casino in Mashantucket, Connecticut. In his first world title shot as a pro, Tarver pitched a complete shutout, decking Griffin in the first and last rounds to shut out his opponent by scores of 120-103 from all three judges.

Seven months later, however, Tarver lost a controversial 12-round majority decision and his WBC crown (he was stripped of his IBF belt) to WBA Super and IBO champion Jones in Las Vegas. The following May at the venue, Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, though, Tarver became the first to knockout Jones, putting him to sleep in the second round.

Tarver then became a mainstream celebrity, appearing on late-night shows and covers of The Ring magazine and KO Magazine, and co-hosting an ESPN Friday Night Fights telecast.

“I was robbed in my first fight with Roy,” Tarver insisted. “They called my knockout of Roy the greatest upset in light heavyweight history. Why didn’t they see me coming? I had beaten everybody ranked ahead of me. Roy was the pound-4-pound king, but he knew. I may not be the fastest, the quickest, or the strongest, but I doubt that there’s ever been a pro fighter to enter the ring with a higher IQ than me. Even at my age, I still feel that way today.”

The WBC stripped Tarver of his title in 2004 for fighting IBF champion Glen Johnson (41-9-2) instead of the WBC mandatory challenger. Johnson, ironically, was stripped of his IBF title for the same reason right before his fight in Los Angeles with Tarver. Tarver and Johnson fought for The Ring and IBO titles and Johnson won a 12-round split decision.

In their rematch six months later in Memphis, Tarver won a unanimous 12-round decision over Johnson to capture the IBO strap. Tarver completed his trilogy with Jones, retaining his IBO title with a unanimous 12-round decision (117-111, 116-112, 116-112).

Tarver lost a 12-round decision June 10, 2006 in Atlantic City to Bernard Hopkins for the IBO championship, which was soon vacated and recaptured by Tarver with a 12-round majority decision over Elvir Muriqi (34-3).

Tarver traveled to Australia in 2011 to challenge IBO cruiserweight champion and local hero Danny Green, who retired after nine rounds, as Tarver added another title belt to his display case.

In December of 2013 in Temecula, California, Tarver knocked out Jonathon Banks (29-2-1) in the seventh round, and Tarver’s last fight was a 12-round split decision draw with former world champion Steve Cunningham (28-7) in Newark, New Jersey.

In 2006, Tarver starred as Mason “The Line” Dixon, the heavyweight champion in the film, Rocky Balboa.

Tarver, as he marches towards his planned history-making performance by becoming the oldest heavyweight world champion of all-time, also has served as a color commentator in boxing for Spike TV and Showtime.

Today, at the age of 49, Tarver is still technically active, and he also trains his son and undefeated middleweight prospect, Antonio Tarver, Jr. (5-0 (4 KOs), where they live in Tampa, Florida.

“I was older than the rest of the boxers on the U.S. Olympic Team and the U.S. National Team,” Tarver remarked. “What a team! Guys like Diego Corrales and Zab Judah didn’t make that Olympic Team. I gave Floyd Mayweather, Jr. his first moniker, ‘Pretty Boy Floyd’, until he changed it years later to ‘Money’. We had a bond on that Olympic team with Floyd, Fernando Vargas, David Reid, Zarim Raheem and the others.”

Although at the age of 49 he is still an active fighter, Tarver occassionally does some color commentating and he trains pro and amateur boxers at a gym in Tampa, Florida. “I’m not retired as a fighter,” Tarver commented. “I started a program, ‘Train with The Champ’, and it includes room rent and training. I like to say it’s an AirB&B for boxing. I train my son (5-0 middleweight Antonio Tarver, Jr. there. I learned a lot from my early days, training in Orlando with my coach, Lou Harris, and I reunited with Jimmy Williams, who is 90 now, training my son together in Tampa.

Tarver also is an advocate of the relatively new “USA Boxing Alumni Association,” which was created to champion a lifelong, mutually beneficial relations between USA Boxing and its alumni, –boxers, officials, coaches and boxing fans — the Alumni Association connects generations of champions, inspiring and giving back to USA Boxing’s future boxing champions, in and out of the ring.

“I’m going online to join,” Tarver said. “I’m looking forward to attending an Alumni Association meeting, June 24-30 during the Junior Olympics in Charleston, West Virginia.

Everything that goes around, comes around, in USA Boxing. Just ask future Hall of Fame candidate Antonio Tarver.

LUCAS ‘LA MAQUINA’ MATTHYSSE DISCUSSES TRAINING CAMP AHEAD OF SUPER FIGHT AGAINST MANNY ‘PACMAN’ PACQUIAO SUNDAY, JULY 15 AT AXIATA ARENA IN KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA

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LUCAS ‘LA MAQUINA’ MATTHYSSE DISCUSSES TRAINING CAMP AHEAD OF SUPER FIGHT AGAINST MANNY ‘PACMAN’ PACQUIAO SUNDAY, JULY 15 AT AXIATA ARENA IN KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA

Photo: @k.o.fotos @frontproofmedia

INDIO, CALIF. Argentine knockout artist Lucas “La Maquina” Matthysse (39-4, 36 KOs) discussed his training camp routine ahead of his super fight against future Hall of Famer Manny “Pacman” Pacquiao (59-7-2, 38 KOs) in a scheduled 12-round welterweight clash. The fight, which will be for Matthysse’s WBA Welterweight World Title, will take place Sunday, July 15 at Axiata Arena in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

The 35-year-old champion is now entering the first stages of sparring at the Boys and Girls Club in Indio, California, with head trainers Joel and Antonio Diaz. This team of brothers oversee a training camp that includes other fighters from the exclusive Golden Boy Promotions stable, including Francisco “El Bandido” Vargas, Diego De La Hoya, Marcelino “Nino” Lopez, Vergil Ortiz Jr., Christian “Chimpa” Gonzalez and Oscar Duarte. Mario Narvaez, who is the brother of former two-division world champion Omar “El Huracan” Narvaez, also forms an important part of the Matthysse team, while Federico Wittenkamp is in charge of his strength and conditioning training. For the native of Trelew, Chubut, Argentina, this is not an ordinary training camp as his career will be defined by the result of this highly anticipated fight.

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Two time Olympic Medalist Dychko to face Marrone June 16 in St. Petersburg, FL

Tampa, FL – Fire Fist Boxing Promotions is proud to announce two-time Olympic medalist Ivan Dychko will face former world title challenger Mike Marrone in an eight round heavyweight contest Saturday, June 16 at The Coliseum in St. Petersburg, FL.

Born in Kazakhstan and fighting out of Kissimmee, FL, Dychko was among the world’s top amateur boxers.

The 27-year-old captured a bronze medal at the 2012 and 2016 Olympic Games. In addition to his Olympic success, Dychko is a three-time medalist at the World Amateur Champions and medaled twice at the Asian Games. As a pro, the 6’9 Dychko’s 5-0 with all of his victories coming by knockout, 3 of which came in less than a round.

Born and raised in Vero Beach, FL, Marrone started his career 18-0. In 2011, Marrone move down in weight to challenge Guillermo Jones for the WBA cruiserweight title but was stopped in the sixth round. Having faced world champions and contenders in Jones, Shannon Briggs, Chazz Witherspoon, DaVarryl Williamson, Francesco Pianeta and Charles Martin, Marrone, 21-8 (15 KO’s), is by far Dychko’s most experienced foe.

“When I got the call about adding Dychko-Marrone to the card I was over the moon,” said Jody Caliguire of Fire Fist Boxing Promotions. “Ivan has all the tools to be a future heavyweight champion and had an incredible amateur career. Mike’s fought for the world title and faced many of the best plus he’s a fan favorite in Florida. Both men have something to prove in this fight and the fans are in for a real treat.”

This special evening of boxing is headlined by a ten round NBA middleweight championship showdown between unbeaten Connor Coyle, an Ireland-based Tampa transplant, against bitter rival Danny “El Bebo” Pastrana of Orlando, FL.

The co-main event pits popular Tampa native Nicholas Iannuzzi (19-4) against Vincent Miranda (17-2) in an eight round cruiserweight affair. Iannuzzi returned from a 3 ½ year layoff in March to knockout Lemarcus Tucker in three rounds. Miranda, who fights out of Atlanta, GA and is originally from Puerto Rico, has wins over former title challengers David Telesco and Brian Barbosa.

Unbeaten welterweight standout Ramal Amanov, undefeated phenom Mark Reyes Jr., 126 pound powerhouse Jose “Lil Pacquiao” Resendez, Ali Tareh, Joseph Fernandez and Rodriguez Cade will all fight in separate undercard bouts.

The “Monster” will wake up American fight fans on Friday morning.

Photos: Naoki Fukuda

From the Ota-City General Gymnasium in Tokyo, two-weight world champion Naoya “Monster” Inoue will move up in weight to face WBA bantamweight champion Jamie McDonnell, and WBC light flyweight champion Ken Shiro will make the third defense of his belt in a rematch against Ganigan Lopez. This world championship doubleheader, promoted by Ohashi Promotions and Teiken Promotions, will be broadcast live and exclusively in the United States at 7:15 a.m. ET on ESPN+ — the recently-launched multi-sport, direct-to-consumer subscription streaming service from The Walt Disney Company’s Direct-to-Consumer and International segment and ESPN.

Inoue (15-0, 13 KOs) has been competing at the world level since 2014 when, in his sixth professional bout, he knocked out Adrian Hernandez in the sixth round to win the WBC light flyweight title. Later that year, he moved up two weight classes and stopped longtime WBO junior bantamweight champion Omar Narvaez in the second round. After making seven defenses of that title, Inoue is moving up to fight an established champion in McDonnell (29-2-1, 13 KOs), who has made six title defenses since winning the belt in May 2014.

Shiro (12-0, 6 KOs) won the WBC light flyweight over Lopez via majority decision in a closely contested bout May 20 of last year in Tokyo. Lopez (28-7, 17 KOs) fought valiantly in the championship rounds, but Shiro did just enough to earn the decision. Shiro last fought on December 30, scoring a fourth-round TKO over Gilberto Pedroza. For Lopez, this will be his first sanctioned fight since he lost the title.

ESPN+ is the first-ever multi-sport, direct-to-consumer subscription streaming service from The Walt Disney Company’s Direct-to-Consumer and International segment and ESPN.

Postol -Taylor Set for June 23

Super Lightweight Viktor “The Iceman” Postol (29-1, 12 KO’s) from Los Angles, CA. faces off with Josh “The Tartan Tornado’’ Taylor (12-0, 11 KO’s) from Scotland, UK.

Josh Taylor hopes to take the next step towards the WBC world super lightweight title when takes on Viktor Postol at the SSE Hydro in Glasgow on June 23.

Photo credits: Jen Charlton

DIBELLA ENTERTAINMENT SIGNS TOP FEMALE PROSPECT TIARA BROWN

New York, NY – DiBella Entertainment has announced the signing of

top female prospect Tiara Brown (4-0, 2 KOs), an undefeated junior lightweight from

Washington, D.C.

“I am so proud to have signed Tiara Brown,” said Lou DiBella, President of DiBella Entertainment. “She is a terrific fighter and an even better person. Tiara is a fulltime Washington, D.C. police officer, a mentor to kids and teens, and a true role model. She is another example of the strong, empowered women boxers who deserve to have their platform.”

“I’m so honored to be working with Lou and his team,” said Brown. “He works from his heart, especially for his female fighters and I felt great being around him. He’s had a great amount of success with numerous female fighters and, given his track record, this is a perfect fit for me.”

A three-year veteran of the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department working in the Sixth District, Brown has the full support of her fellow officers who regularly attend her fights.

“The police department and the Chief of Police, Peter Newsham, are big supporters of mine and I look forward to putting on another show for them on June 30,” said Brown. “I’m here to make an impact on my weight division and fight top contenders as soon as possible.”

Brown will return to action on Friday, June 30, in Washington, D.C. against Carla Torres in the main event at the Sphinx Club.

While competing as an amateur, Brown was a bronze medalist at the 2015 World Championships in Korea and a gold medalist at the 2012 World Championships in China.